Category Archives: Customer

Using DeposZip Under Linux (Mint 11/Ubuntu 11.04)

Our new credit union provides the capability to do on-line check deposits using an application called DeposZip. Of course, their web site only mentions support/instructions for Windows and MacOS, not Linux. Well, the application is actually server-hosted and uses a Java applet (or some ActiveX thing if on Windows) to get things done.

If it goes as planned, the application can work with your TWAIN-enabled scanner to get the check images directly within the application. Sadly, this did not work for me – it produced a pop-up window saying only “SK.gnome.TwainManager.getDefaultSource()LSK/gnome/twain/TwainSource;”. I figure this is refering to a value that is supposed to be defined somewhere (and is not?), but in looking at the file system and googling I came up with nothing. OK, so the application offers two more options under the applet, copying the image from the clipboard (which also did not work – with no error this time) and loading an image file, which does work.

To create the image file, I scanned the front and back of the check separately using XSane and saved each as a .png (or jpeg) image. I then loaded these images as requested by the application. DeposZip took the 200 dpi color scans and further processed them to what looked like high contrast greyscale or B&W images shown in a preview. The rest systematically worked OK from there, the deposit was accepted for processing.

BTW, DeposZip also offers a “zero client” version as a link in the footer of the applet. This seems to load another page totally doing away with the java applet and using instead a standard web form with upload link for the image files. This works similarly to the above, but without the image preview you see in the applet happening until the next step in the process.

So long as you follow the endorsement instructions exactly (which unfortunately require you to write a whole lot of stuff on the reverse of the check) and the check is below $1500, the deposit will go through fine. Nice way to avoid a drive to the bank or ATM!

A Frugal Shopper’s Bonus: Ebates

One of the earliest sites I joined on the internet was this one, way back in 2002 – wow, 2002! Seems like things have changed so much, so quickly!

OK, back to the real point of this post. I’m frugal, I admit it. When I buy something significant, like a new car or computer, I research them and strive to find the best one and to get the best price. So when I’m done, it annoys me if I find out later I missed an obvious chance to save more. When buying stuff on-line, Ebates is frequently that chance.

Ebates is a referral/rebate system for on-line shopping. They have selected partners that will give you cash back – in most cases on top of any other coupon or deal – for items you purchase after going through the Ebates site to get there. You get the cash back as a total accumulated through Ebates, paid quarterly. Their partners are ones you likely already are looking at, you just don’t know otherwise about the rebates! Examples of their 1200+ store partners are HP, Dell, Godiva, JC Penney, Sears, Macy’s, LL Bean, etc., including my favorite computer/electronics store: NewEgg.

Generally, the only thing you have to do is remember to visit Ebates first, then follow the link from their site to the place you’d otherwise shop already! After that, it is all automatic (in a few cases, you need to enter a discount code or similar). Generally, you get 1-6% cash back, but I’ve also seen ones as high as 15% or fixed dollar amounts like $60. For stuff you were already going to buy.

So now you know why I kick myself if I forget about using Ebates. Don’t kick yourself – join and start saving now. If you follow my link here to sign up, I’ll possibly get a small reward for referring you and you’ll still get the same great deals – so please click below to join for yourself (and me). And remember to use them afterwards!

Great Customer Service Sells!

I’m a firm believer in being an assertive customer when a product does not live up to your expectations. Great companies know how to handle that and turn your relationship with them to an asset.

Just concluded one such experience with Richard Green at TofuXPress. My wife had purchased one of their devices for me after seeing the Rube Goldberg method I had previously used for pressing the moisture out of tofu in preparation for frying. They make a device that does this neatly, without the stacks of plates and various heavy items from the kitchen that I’d used before. My only problem was that a tab on it broke, very quickly after I’d received it. I put the broken piece aside with the intention of following up, but of course life intervened and I didn’t get around to finding the box to get the contact information until after the warranty was up.

So I tried contacting them, told my story, and offered design change suggestions to address what I’d seen. Richard, their Operations Manager, responded nicely and a conversation continued from there. Long story short, they made an out-of-warranty exception and sent me not only that part, but also two others that mated with it. The new part had a design change just like what I had suggested. Now I have nothing but appreciation for them and we have drier tofu again without the gymnastics!

I highly recommend tofuXpress.com.

CSV File Import to Quicken 2007

Tonight I was spending some time catching up on many (more than I care to mention) months’ worth of finances. A couple of accounts had significant transactions which needed entry into Quicken. Due to Intuit having disabled direct connection with my financial institution (because they want me to buy something newer than what I’d already paid them for), I was stuck with the prospect of having to enter many things by hand. Ugh!

Well, a bit of googling later, I came upon http://xl2qif.chez-alice.fr/calc2qif_en.php . This is an OpenOffice.org spreadsheet macro to convert csv data to QIF format. Unfortunately, Quicken 2007 will not support QIF import to bank accounts (yet another planned “feature” vs. it working successfully in a prior version) but there is a workaround… you can simply import the QIF into a “cash” account and then cut and paste the transactions over to the correct account from there.

It worked almost perfectly. I downloaded the csv files from my financial institution, opened them in OO Calc and then applied the macro to map and save the selected data to QIF for import into Quicken. The only issue was that I could not get the amounts of the transactions to import for some reason. In all fairness, it is late and I didn’t spend much time trying — it was much easier to just type the figures by hand into the otherwise complete entries. Way better than doing it all by hand!

This may be the final shove to move me to an open source finance program. Intuit’s business model of breaking SW features I’ve already paid for is problematic. This, coupled with the complete uselessness in the past few years of the Quicken to TurboTax import, takes the cake. I guess they can’t compete on new features alone? I would routinely and willingly pay for updates before, when features got better. But now that MS Money is dead as competition, I don’t expect things with them to get any better soon.