Tag Archives: eeepc

Password and Files Encryption/Sync/Backup: Gettin ‘er Done!

One of my to-do list items for quite some time now has been to get my computer files organized and to set up automated backup and synchronization across my computing devices.

I’d kept putting this one off because I wanted to deal with some foundational issues first:

  • pruning down my files and eliminating duplicates both within my desktop machine’s file system as well as with my netbook’s files
  • selecting a sync solution
  • converting my password safe from my former J-Pilot/Palm solution
  • etc.

I did a ton of research and would get close to doing something then another priority would take charge and it would get put on the back burner again. Well, in recent months I’ve finally selected and put in place several needed building blocks:

  • Password Sync: originally I’d selected KeePassX but I then looked further into LastPass, which does much the same thing and has many more features bundled in – they key one being a native cloud sync and backup capability for all our passwords. Works on effectively every platform I would ever consider including my Debian (Linux Mint Debian Edition) and Linux Mint machines, my wife’s Mac and a possible future smart phone/tablet, etc. Firefox, Safari, Chrome, etc. all supported! Done on my machines, pending on the Mac (which got KeePassX in the interim). [Update 1 Jan 2014: Mac is finally done, had to update OS X to enable Safari to update to a version supported by LastPass. I’m not a Mac expert and it is just different enough from Linux/Unix that I had to figure a bit out.] Use my referral code and we’ll both get a free month of LastPass Premium! https://lastpass.com/f?2884566
  • File Sync and Cloud Backup: I selected SpiderOak because of great cross-platform support. Think of it as Dropbox but with built-in cloud encryption so no worries about the files being compromised on the server/network. I’d considered rolling my own solution using a power-sipping always-on Linux ARM-based device with rsync and/or a PogoPlug but realized SpiderOak did what I needed in much easier fashion. Done on my desktop, pending on the others.
  • Local File Encryption: Protecting our sensitive files in case of having a machine fall into someone else’s possession. I selected TrueCrypt because of (getting to sound like a broken record?) similar excellent cross-platform support. I’d considered other solutions including the built-in Windows, Linux and Mac filesystem encryption options, but what I wanted was a single solution that would work with all of them plus enable syncing the secured files across all our devices using SpiderOak. The kicker for me was when I figured out that what really required the local protection of encryption was actually quite small compared to our number of overall files – I don’t care if someone finds out what I paid for our gas bill or my various basic correspondence, yet our financial account details, tax records and similar would need protection (these files end up taking well under a Gig of space). Remember, LastPass protects all our passwords separately. Done on my desktop, others pending.

The best part of all this is that every one of these solutions is free for the basic features we need and they all work across all the machines we have and anticipate being interested in at any point in the future. If/when we grow to need additional features or capacity, they are priced quite attractively (SpiderOak and LastPass). TrueCrypt is totally free for all features. Most are open source too.

Once I realized the amount of encrypted storage required was so small, my interest in consolidating and eliminating file duplicates became a nice-to-have vs. a need (I had previously been concerned that syncing a large TrueCrypt volume over the internet would be a significant performance issue). Getting to a secure solution was more important and a brief scare when I left my netbook behind at a public dance a few weeks ago (with several financial files on it) pushed me to make that part happen sooner rather than later.

Getting a NewEgg mailing with a Shell Shocker special on a 500GB hybrid (solid state and conventional platter) drive for under $80 put the final bit in place – now my netbook could have more space than my total desktop disks, so it would all fit as is without further winnowing. And with the SSD portion of the new drive used as OS and program storage, the machine promises to scream along compared to before and last a lot longer on battery power.

In order to make this solution the best it can be, my first major consolidating step will be to start over with a totally fresh install of the latest Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) with the new disk on my Asus EeePC 1000HA and then layer in the individual pieces as described above. I’m starting on that work now and will post more when done.

I’m excited to have this work finally coming to fruition! After my netbook is done, I’ll be moving on to finishing the same things on my desktop machine and my wife’s Mac (after a required Snow Leopard update there – to update Safari – to support LastPass). Wish me luck!

Linphone: a VOIP Softphone for Linux (and others)

In an earlier blog post I mentioned I was using Twinkle as a softphone client for my VOIP service from Galaxyvoice (GV). As I also mentioned in this entry I’ve now switched my netbook over to a Debian Linux. I’d not yet got around to (re-)installing a VOIP client on the renewed EeePC. So when I saw that GV was now recommending something called Linphone, which seemed to be very cross-platform (Win, Lin, Mac, Android, etc.), I decided to check it out.

Turns out Linphone is available in the Debian repository, so it was a trivial task to install via Synaptic. As GV recommended Linphone, they also provided account settings info. – so about 3 minutes later, I was making my first call from the netbook – worked great!

I’ve not yet tried out the video calling, but the camera preview looks smooth and lag-free so I expect it will be great as well.

I recommend you check out Linphone!

Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) on an Asus EeePC 1000HA

I’m a long time user of UNIX-based computers and have been using Linux exclusively for my primary computing for close to 10 years now. For the past couple of years Linux Mint has become my favorite distribution for desktop and laptop use.

This EeePC netbook had been running Eeebuntu Linux, which was fantastic. Eeebuntu 3.0 was based on Ubuntu 9.04 and Debian Unstable. Built with customization to various packages and a modified kernel it provided support to this netbook that was a perfect fit. That project enabled all the function keys to work and had outstanding power management that kept the machine running on battery for extended use.

Sadly, the Eeebuntu project seems to have broken down as they pursued new goals. IMHO they lost direction and got sidetracked with developing a fancy website for their proposed new release and expanding their project’s scope significantly. In the end this stalled any real end-user progress. In the mean time the old Eeebuntu became outdated and, being based on Ubuntu 9.04, stopped getting any updates. So things like Flash stopped working, etc. I waited as long as I could for their new release, but needed to move on.

Getting tired of the need for repeated reinstalls required by both Windows and Ubuntu-based Linux, I became very interested in Debian Linux. Debian is a rolling release, meaning updated software is available regularly for your existing installation. In practice, this means a software environment that should never require reinstallation but will still keep up with application development! And Linux Mint happened to announce the availability of a version based on Debian (called LMDE)… this gave me the push needed to give Debian a go on this netbook.

So I installed the latest available image of LMDE on my Eeepc in Fall 2011 from a USB stick. Everything went smoothly, no real hiccups at all. There was a minor issue with a package due to an upstream Debian problem which was fixed by marking one package to not update (this was covered in a note on the LMDE page). When installed, I had a good working system with most of the standard function keys working – the machine was totally usable but the dedicated keys for webcam switching, etc. did not operate (unlike how they had under Eeebuntu) and the power management was not tuned for battery preservation.

Luckily one of the former Eeebuntu developers (Andrew Wyatt, a.k.a. fewt) has made available an applet for power management of EeePCs (and other machines) that could be installed. Called Jupiter, it allows switching the CPU to one of three power scaling modes automatically on power events, enabling much longer battery life. It has other functions as well including video mode/external monitor selection and touchpad control.

The combination of LMDE and Jupiter have become a great solution for this netbook and I look forward to using them together for a long, long time to come!

Wireless Woes Resolved

In an earlier post, I’d detailed how Tomato on the Asus WL-520gU brought the internet back to our home in a delightful way. However, there had been an ongoing wireless problem with my EEE PC running Eeebuntu linux 3.0.

I’d been puttering with those issues on and off for a while, having got to a state where things mostly worked, most of the time. My biggest complaint was that I’d have to try multiple times to connect to some access points, but others would work straight away. Unfortunately, the router at the in-laws was one of those, and the new Asus at home turned out to be even worse. All the other clients liked these routers just fine, so I knew the issue was with this PC.

Sooo, long story short, I figured out that there were multiple drivers competing from all my attempts, trying to take care of the same wireless connection. I ended up finally disabling all of them but for the ath5k driver (which connects great, but has a speed fluctuation issue) in /etc/modprobe.d and then forced the connection speed with an iwconfig setting. Now the PC has a great connection all the way to the full extent of our property and streaming hulu is without a glitch.

Another minor irritation apparently solved. 🙂